A Travellerspoint blog

Chinese perspectives of Chinese employment

sunny 60 °F

Today's blog is going to be all about employment in China. As a soon to be graduate (wooohoooo!!!!!!) talking about job searches and future careers makes one a little stressed out. (Ahhhhh!!!)
SO when i found out the topics for our Chinese classes this week, "employment after graduation" and "we are finally getting married" my stress level skyrocketed. Thank God i am only a soon to be grad and not a soon to be bride as well or else I would probably need to seek therapy. On the bright side I now know how to say "only pick the best" and "part time employee."
Employment was also my contemporary Chinese culture class topic, in which I was responsible for leading discussion. It was just hitting me from all angles this week. Last Tuesday I had asked my aunty if she could help me find a job. She responded pretty enthusiastically and from what I got out of the conversation her husbands little sisters friends...cousin(?) works at a very big business and makes a lot of money. She kept saying it was a big international business and that I could probably get a job there because of my English. Later we looked up the name on my iPad. It was Ikea. Worst comes to worst I can always have a nice furnished apartment.
The interesting thing that I would like to share with you today is the idea of employment in China and how one goes about finding employment. I recently learned that it would be fair to say that high school in China is equivalent to College in the United States and College in the United States is equivalent to Chinese high schools. The idea behind this, is that in China it is hard to get into a good college but relatively easy to graduate from one. Chinese students begin getting tested from elementary school. They test to see which middle school they can go to, which high school they can get into and finally they take the college entrance exam. This is similar to the SAT, but you only get one shot, and in a place where receiving a higher education is a very crucial part of life, it causes an immense amount of stress on the students to do well. To sum it up, from what i have heard is that If you don't go to a good college you don't get a good job. Also, like the United States, there is the problem of whether or not a graduate should attend graduate school.

Today we had the pleasure of speaking with four students who are about to graduate. Their punctuality on job searching is something I am very envious of. The first girl, she gave herself the english name flora and she was absolutely adorable. She had curled her hair and had the whitest skin I have seen in China so far, other then my own. For someone who hadn't learned english as her second language she spoke with great confidence and her thought process was very fluid and structured. She was a journalism major and she was just accepted into a graduate school in the UK. She began explaining to us her experience from middle to high school. She was from a very poor village in the Sichuan province (she was very happy to hear we had just returned from that province) and was enrolled in a boarding school. She said that she felt as though she lost part of her freedom when she was sent to this school. It was also designed as a military academy. The rules and regulations she had to follow were numerous. They weren't allowed to have mobile phones, or use the Internet. They were allowed out of the school for only three days a month, and the only source of entertainment they had was a small kiosk that sold newspapers and a few magazines. She said she felt like she was in jail. However, she expressed immense joy upon arriving at Nanjing University, but honestly who wouldn't?
One of the other speakers was also from Sichuan province (actually Chengdu, which is where the Pandas live). He chose the courageous English name of Rafael and was graduating with a major of teaching Chinese as a second language. However, he kept referring to it as a majority and it took us a while to figure out his actual meaning. He explained to us that he felt it was more important to find a job after graduation rather then go to graduate school. He was already offered three jobs. The lead sales consultant at IBM, a marketing job at CCTV ( the main Chinese tv station) or a job at at a bank. You should have seen the looks on our faces and how fast our jaws dropped when he told us he was picking the bank. He said to an outsider, having a job at IBM or CCTV would look very shiny ( we think he meant prestigious) but in reality the bank would pay more money. He said it boiled down to the fact that he needed to give money to his family and although he heard that working in a bank is very boring, it is a place that will pay quite a bit. Also, he said that the idea of housing would be very difficult, as the other jobs are located in Beijing. This was something when brought to my attention is very obvious, but I had never given it a thought. In the states if you want to move somewhere, you are almost guaranteed that there will be an apartment somewhere in your price range. In China this is not the case, and it is rare to rent an apartment for anything less then 70years.
The other speaker was a girl who couldn't speak English. She was majoring in chemistry and law. She didn't say much other then she wanted to work on public housing laws and that her grades were not that good which makes finding a job difficult. Lastly she said she wants to move back to her hometown because at this point she feels family is more important.
Lastly we heard from Raj. He is one of the Chinese roommates who has a french name, of one of korean classmates in my Chinese class. wow that's a little confusing, haha. He is planning on finding a job after graduation as well. Currently he is looking to move to Taiwan. He described high school and middle school in china "as a battlefield in which your parents are cooperating with your teachers." He spoke with great confidence as well and had the best English by far.
Needless to say after this short little presentation I was feeling pretty down about not having a job, or a job prospect. I decided it was time to visit ammity international again, the local non profit. I couldn't remember the name of the lady I had spoken with before, nor did I have any idea where I was going. I just wandered into their office and knocked on the first door I came too. Turns out it was their financial department. They were a little confused when I tried to explain I wanted to volunteer for them. They got on the phone and asked a coworker what to do. I was described as "美女,很高,非常白的礼服"pretty girl, very tall, with very white skin. This description must have worked because I was told to wait outside, and that someone would be with me shortly. 5 minutes passed and I saw people come and go, but no one stopped to talk. Finally I spotted the original lady I had come here to find. I approached her and we started to discuss volunteer opportunities. She said because my Chinese was not that good there is maybe not that many things for me to do. All they have is English editing work (perfect that is what I wanted to do!). I start on Monday at 1:30 and they have a desk set up for me already. While I was on the job searching role I got back in contact with the bilingual magazine from last month. I will meet them tomorrow to discuss my hours and starting pay as their part time English editor! It's no IBM, but hey it's experience right?

Posted by Kaceyroo 06:55 Archived in China Comments (2)

Sichuan day 2!

all seasons in one day 70 °F

Today was the day we climbed Emei Shan 峨眉山. After breakfast we were told to only take the necessary items for one night, as we would be hiking the mountain and then walking to our hostel. We walked to the bus stop and all piled on a big tour bus headed for the mountain. I thought that maybe because we are on a really high mountain and there's lots of traffic, that maybe the drivers would slow down and drive a little bit more cautiously. But no, it only encouraged them and on more than one occasion we were flying around corners passing other busses. We started popping motion sickness pills immediately, and they were only sort of effective.
We finally arrived at the bottom of the mountain. We were herded into our little travel group to hear the game plan from Gary. First we would climb the beginning part to get to the lifts. Then we would split into two different groups. Those that would like to walk an hour and half up the mountain, or those that would like to take a five minute gondola ride.
Before we even made it to that part, we first had to make it past the monkeys. Yup, I said monkeys.
These things were absolutely terrifying, and on more than one occasion I saw them launch at people, clawing at their bags, their cameras and even their faces. They were in no way afraid of humans, and would do anything to get food. Check out the photos to see how close you can really get to them, or I guess how close they can get to you.
image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image


After surviving the monkeys we made it to the big decision point. Walk the stairs or take the gondola. Myself, among close to ten of my classmates, chose to take the stairs, all couple hundred...or maybe even a thousand. I have absolutely no idea, but they were straight up for most of the "walk" and I was too out of breath to count.
Finally we reached the summit and were greeted by this....image

image

image

image


image

image

image

image

image

image


To be honest I had no idea what we were climbing to. I thought it was going to be a small monastery, but I can say I was pleasantly surprised. For the amount of hiking we were only at the golden summit for a matter of ten minutes before we thought it would be better to meet up with the rest of the group. We met at the restaurant and were greeted by more spicy food and numbing peppers. Numbing peppers are little peppers that look like black ground pepper, but when chewed immediately turn your entire mouth numb. Of course later on in the trip this led to a "who can get their tongue most numb" competition. Rumor has it more than 30 were eaten, but that's a different story entirely.
After lunch we proceeded to the gondola and in a few minutes were at the bottom of the mountain, in the bus and fast asleep.
We arrived a few hours later at another parking lot and were greeted with this sign:
image

image


Our "walk" aka another hour hike up to our hotel was very picturesque.
image

image


There were many tea plantations along the way and the hippie inside of me was thinking "wow the tea here is going to be so organic" no sooner did I think that, I saw an old man dressed in very traditional farming clothes, a big rice picking hat weaving in and out of the rows of tea. It was one of those "ahh I'm in china" moments, then he turned around and I saw that he had a huge pack on his back and was spraying pesticides all over the tea plants. And then I had another....ahhh I'm in china moment.
We arrived at our hotel pretty soon after. We sat outside under a canapoy. We were all boiling hot and the humidity was killing us. Not two minutes after we sat down we were immediately all served hot tea. Oh the irony.
image

image


According to our teachers this hotel was brand new and was family run. The rooms were very large and modestly furnished. The bathroom was a very strange setup however. One wall, the wall facing the rest of the room was "frosted" glass and the other wall, facing the door, was just plain glass. It was like showering in a fish bowl.
We headed outside to eat dinner, which like the past few meals was spicy. As we ate dusk quickly approached, and it was almost completely dark by the time we were finished. They cleared our dishes and returned with candles. The power was out. We all quickly ran to the only guy on the program who smoked so that we could get our candles lit, and we all headed to our rooms. To be honest it was pretty creepy, but the power came on maybe an hour later. Weall crowded in one of the rooms, minus one girl who goes to bed relatively early, and played cards. None of us could stay up too late because of the amount of hiking so we crashed pretty early, for a college student.

Posted by Kaceyroo 06:08 Archived in China Tagged emeishan Comments (2)

China caught the flu

rain 40 °F

I'm not sure if this has made it to international news yet, but....the bird flu has broken out in China. While staying in Sichuan I saw the news about a few suspected cases of it in Jiangsu province, the province I currently live in. It turns out there are only a couple people who have contracted it so far, and I believe a few of them are in Nanjing. SO....fingers crossed I don't get the bird flu!!
Also I just wanted to say this marks my two months of being abroad! Only two months and 12 days left before I come home!
Oh and PS!
The rest of the Sichuan posts will have to wait a few days. I am having major difficulties uploading photos and I refuse to post a blog about some of the most gorgeous monasteries without having photographs to share with you all.
I can talk about what I did today though, which included FISHING!! And EATING!
I was looking forward to a nice resting day today, but not a chance. I was woken at 8am and told to get dressed quickly because my aunty and uncle were coming to pick me up. Most of my clothes were still dirty from our trip to Sichuan last week and most still smelled like fish, so I chose a dress with some tights. Later I realized we were going fishing and I felt silly wearing what I was, but a few of the women showed up in heels. Fishing in heels, i would love to hear what grandpa had to say about this. We drove for about a half hour and came to this narrow road along a dirty river. I can't help but remember what I have been hearing on the news lately about dead pigs being found in rivers and thousands of ducks popping up dead on river banks (if you haven't heard about this already I encourage you to google "dead pigs in Shanghai"), and thinking that I don't want to eat anything that comes out of that river. Thankfully we pulled off the road and up to this oldish cabun like building. It reminded me of a lakeside cabin/motel. There were numerous rooms and they had numbers on them, later I found out they were dining rooms. This entire thing over looked a "pond." More or less it looked like a huge concrete swimming pool, filled with water that made the nearby river look clean. And this is where we fished. On the back side of this were numerous greenhouses. Most were filled with strawberries and others were filled with different types of vegetables. I gave fishing a try but it is no where what I am used to doing. The poles we used were about 20 feet long, with no reel. We used one tiny live worm and fought for elbow room among all of the grandpas. You were lucky if you got downwind from one that didn't have a cigarette dangling from his mouth. The man next to us looked like he should be on the fishing channel of China. He had a reel holder, a net holder and instead of worms he was using what looked like homemade power bait. He was catching them left and right. But ah ha the jokes on him, you pay per pound of fish you catch or i guess per kg? damn you metric system. I fished for about ten minutes before I lied and said my arms were tired. Really I was just bored out of my mind. No jiggs, no trolling, you only stand there and stare at your pole till you think something is nibbling on it. Not my type of fishing! I didn't even get to gaff anything!!
I watched my aunty fish for a bit, she caught one after a while which was pretty eventful. My uncle had gone in with the men to play cards, so the grandpas were huddled around us trying to get the hook out of its mouth, the whole time my aunty is getting her line tangled in everyone one else's. Then my uncle comes over and tries to put it in the net, and it gets loose and bounces between his legs towards the water, it was something you would see on the three stooges.
I eventually got cold and bored and went searching for my little sister. She was inside with her friend playing games on their phones. The only game I had on my phone was sudoku. Still not any good at it after the hour we sat there and played. Lunch was delicious, of course fish was served. I choose not to eat any of it, mostly because it was in the middle of the table and I am not that confident at my chopstick skills especially in front of a large group of people.
After lunch we went out and separated my aunys catch. She got 7 altogether. Then things got really interesting. Instead of just batting the fish, they were dumped onto the ground and then transferred into a cooler filled with water. Multiply this by about 4 others doing the same thing and the whole parking lot was just flopping around. I haven't checked yet, but I think they're in our bathroom now. This takes fresh fish to an extreme.
We returned to my aunty and uncles house to watch some tv. Then my aunty and I rode double on her scooter back to the house I am staying at, the whole time I was in my dress. As if I don't already draw enough attention to myself, I am now accidently flashing people while screaming bloody marry flying through interesections behind a woman wearing a neon purple jacket. Oh China I don't think you were prepared for me.
Now I'm sitting at my desk trying to find the motivation to do my homework. It sounds like a monsoon outside, if I were back home it would definitely be one of those nights we would worry about a tree coming down. The wind is scary loud and I can't help but to get a little nervous about flooding, but we are on the fifth floor, I should be ok at least for the night ;)

Posted by Kaceyroo 06:04 Archived in China Comments (1)

Sichuan day 1!

sunny 60 °F

First things first!!! Here is the link to my classmates vlog!! It is the one of us teaching at the migrant school and he explains in more -and if not in better detail- the issues revolving around migrant children.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzCAfUlfDV8
And now.....

SICHUAN

-this is from last week-
Thursday night we headed to the night market to buy some tanktops and other clothes for Sichuan. Then we returned and I spent the rest of the night packing my big backpack. Later I realized I should've been a bit more organized, as in I probably should've packed more then just two shirts. It was hard though because I was given grocery bags of food from my 奶奶, which took up a bunch of room.
The way that the food works in China is that there are four or five provinces that have a very prominent type of food. Like in the United States we have Italian food, Mexican food etc. In China though it is more localized. For example, Shanghai's food is sweet. Sichuan however? Spicy, spicier then spicy, as in a layer of peppers on top of every dish. And not just any type of peppers. I am almost posotove that they would be ilegal in the United States because after eating one, your ENTIRE mouth will go numb. Not just a little tingly, but numb numb. Now for someone who can't even handle mild salsa, I knew this was going to be a major problem. My host family knew this as well so they were scared I wouldn't be able to eat while in Sichuan. They were stuffing food in my hands even as I was heading out the door. Too bad it was bread. Oh well it's only six days, it will give my face sometime to slim down. :b
I headed to the bus with my backpacking pack on. If I didn't think I already caused some staring in my small neighborhood, walking through with this huge pack practically started a riot. No I'm kidding....not a riot, a car crash. That's two that I have caused so far. People really need to watch the road and not the 外国人.
We waited in the lobby of the dorm for a few late night partiers who over slept and then we hopped on our big tour bus to head to the airport. There was an abnormal amount of traffic and the ride took probably twice as long as it should've. We arrived at the airport when we were supposed to be boarding. We checked in and made it through security in time to run to our gate and wait for an hour. Our flight was delayed. I have yet to fly domestically in China without having a delay. They let us board and we sat on the Tarmac for probably two hours. Thankfully I was in the really comfortable middle seat...Other then being delayed our flight was fine.
We arrived in Sichuan and we headed to get our baggage. Only a few of us checked a bag, I was one of them. I saw my bag come down the ramp, and I couldn't help but be sad because of how dirty it has gotten. It was brand new when I brought it to China, now it is filthy and covered in oil and dirt from the airplanes. I was thinking of how impossible it was going to be to wash it, when I picked it up, and the entire thing was wet. I had my metal Klean Kanteen strapped to the side so I thought that maybe it had just leaked. Definitely not. It was fish...my entire bag was soaking and reeeeeeekeeddddd of fish. I quickly opened my bag...yup everything inside was wet and smelled like fish too. Not the greatest way to start the trip. I was pissed. I asked my teachers if we could go complain to someone and see if I couldn't at least get compensated in someway, so that maybe I could buy some clothes while I washed all of mine. No way, it's not broken or damaged so the airlines won't do anything about it. I pretty much dragged my bag behind me to our tour bus...
We met our tour guide "Gary." He's a young guy and a pretty awesome tour guide, but boy oh boy does he like to talk. He was standing in the front of the bus, right next to the clock. It was hard not to groan after an hour and half of him talking. We stopped at a small convenience store to buy some snacks. I really really had to go to the bathroom and I knew we were going to have a long bus ride ahead of us. I asked the guy in the store if they had a bathroom. He seemed a little hesitant and then finally with kind of a smirk on his face, he said yes we have one. He pointed to the back of the store. I'm pretty sure I let out a squeal when I walked in. It looked like some thing off of Saw. It was dirty, there were strange piles of clothes on the floor, there were things on the walls, and he toilet was obviously broken. Yea I don't think so. I turned around and immediately walked out, he snickered as I walked by.
Eventually all of the girls went and begged to use the bathroom at the restaurant next door. When we got back to the bus I was standing with the tour guides and my two teachers waiting for the rest of my classmates. A small boy walked towards us, stopped right in front of me, stared, threw up his hands, screamed something in Chinese and took off running. The tour guides and my teachers immediately started laughing, turns out he yelled "I surrender." Who knows why.
After a long bus ride we ended up at a really awesome hotel. I was roommates with Jasmine, one of my classmates in the upper level class. As soon as we dropped our stuff off and strategically placed my bag in front of the window, we headed to dinner. We as in, jasmine, lev, JR and myself. Prior to the start of the Sichuan trip,us four and our other classmate katlyn decided to buy matching neon "Nike" fanny packs, for $2 online. We all have a different color of the rainbow and boy do we look freaking amazing. Only in China can we wear these.
We went to dinner in this ridiculous garb and I scowered the menu for something that wasn't spicy. I ended up with garlic shoots and "mixed meat." It was delicious and not spicy, but the meat was definitely more fat then anything. The restaurants in this town were all set up very differently. They kind of reminded me of a state fair, as in you ate out side on picnic bench like tables, underneath a tin roof. Some point during dinner it started to pour down rain. We quickly payed our bill and snuck into a near by shop to buy some panchos. Fanny pack...panchos....what have I turned into??
After spending less money on 白酒 ( white liquor) then our panchos, we headed back to the hotel. We all crammed in one of the rooms, played cards, and drank until the wee hours. At one point bohemian rhapsody came on. We sang so loud one of our classmates from two floors up came to quiet us down.

Posted by Kaceyroo 07:49 Archived in China Comments (1)

Hello my name is_____

sunny 50 °F

Goodness gracious! 5 blog comments when I logged on today! Thanks guys (: it makes me happy knowing people are actually reading what I'm writing! :b I gotta say, when you are Facebook deprived seeing you have a blog comment is like seeing you have a friend request or like 10 facebook notifications.
I will be honest when I say this week completely flew by!! I was worried about writing the blog post for our first time teaching at the migrant school and well...now it's a week later and I haven't written it. My upmost or is it utmost(?) apologies. I'm tempted to just save it and write a twofer one as we are heading to teach there again tomorrow. Butttttttt I would probably not get that post out for another week, Lordy the life of a student.
So lets start at last Friday.
We first went to the urban planning museum. How do I put this....it has a lame name, so I imagined it to be really lame, and then once we got there i thought it was really awesome.....and then it turned out to actually be really lame. Sorry confusing thought process. It pretty much is museum about the aspects of Nanjing being a city. Boring huh? BUT! They had theeee coolest model city built, and it lit up!! And there was a light show and they had each district lit up and a cool movie playing. Sorry for the blurry photos I was not expecting my lighting situation. image

image

image

image

image

image


I guess in the future they are going to outlaw crocs..?
After the super cool floor show we got to watch a "3-D" movie....aka they tried to turn us all blind. Like one of my classmates out it, if they just took out the one hot air balloon in the beginning of the film, it wouldn't have needed to be 3D. Seriously half of us couldn't see after the movie because it had such strange graphics.
This film was about where Nanjing would be in 2020. They kept referring to this as a Great Leap Forward. Which confused most of us as the Great Leap Forward was a famine that killed thousands of people in china during the 1950's , so why would did they want that name attached to their urbanization planning? I have no idea, what I do know is that while watching the movie it took a good 15 minutes for me to realize that they were discussing a future Nanjing, not the current city and I got really excited when they showed a huge Ferris wheel and amusement park, only to later be let down. Also I should've known because they showed a ridiculous amount of green grass and they said "even the sky will be clear, with no pollution." At least they know there is a problem!
After the museum we went to a nearby shopping district to eat lunch. I chose to eat a very famous Nanjing dish, duck blood soup.
image

image

They should rename to to every part of the duck but the meat. Not only was there duck blood, but duck intestines, liver and hearts, all accompanied by spongey tofu and strange noodles. It was awesome to say the least, but I am so tired if eating intestines, they are really not my favorite.
After lunch I got fruit on a stick. Fruit in China is more popular then I expected it to be and I am shocked that I haven't gotten sick from eating it yet. Although you have to be careful which pieces of fruit you buy, as in avoid the big pieces. For example if there are two apples, both look good but one is noticeably bigger then the others, don't eat it. Chances are it has been injected with "fruit steroids" to grow bigger. I don't know the technical term, I just know its bad for you, but you can tell as soon as you bite into it that its a little strange.
So far though I have yet to have a problem with the fruit on a stick. Any type of fruit you can imagine is shishkabobbed and then coated in hard sugar, much like the huge apple spear my grandma bought me before. image

image


However, I usually get the fresh strawberry ones, although the grapes are very good as well, but I have yet to find grape ones without tomatoes mixed in. I get the feeling they just like to put the round fruit together.
What is the best thing to do after eating fruit on a stick? Buy bubble tea of course! I am going to turn into a huge bubble by the time I leave China. I get one every day. They are absolutely amazing. Imagine raspberry hot chocolate, but cooled, then mixed in with chewy raspberry jelly and chocolate pudding all in a convenient cup and huge straw. Omnomnomnom I will return to america obese, you can count on it.
After all of this THEN we went to the migrant school to teach. We ended up having to kill sometime at the metro station so we were all entertained by Lev trying to wear my jacket. Enjoy these next few photos. image

image

image

image

*note the women laughing in the background* by the time we actually started walking to the school we all had tears in our eyes and then we had to make a pit stop at the "public" restroom because we drank too much bubble tea. And when I say public...I mean your business is completely public...like there is a trough on the floor....and a row of women just doing their thing. There was one "private" area in the corner. Which we all took turns waiting for.
Finally after that little adventure we made it to the school, and only a minute early. Lev and I are group teachers so we get our own classroom all to ourselves for a whole hour. We were all pretty excited because we got the same class that we taught the first time and we were greeted with yells and cheers, and yes...they remembered our names. Today's lesson was about hobbies. We are supposed to somewhat follow their textbook but we are given quite a bit of wiggle room. Long story short we started talking about spongebob square pants, and Patrick. We taught them to say things like: "spongebob enjoys cooking hamburgers, his hobby is cooking." Once they got that down, we moved onto things like reading, games, tv, and finally music. When we asked what instruments they could play they all whipped out recorders and immediately three girls were singled out by their classmates to perform for us. Lets just say Chinese records compared to American recorders....not as painful to listen to. There is definitely a different mentality between students. If you ask who likes drawing? They will all immediately turn to one person and say she is the best. Whoever is the best at something is definitely known by all of their peers. We have two kids in our class who's English is a bit more advanced then the others. They sit right in the front row and if we ask for someone to repeat a sentence all the classmates pressure these two to speak first. It's competitive of course, but also very supportive of it...like hey I know your the best....but I'm going to encourage you to show off your talents whenever possible. Then again it could just be because we are foreign teachers and they want the whole class to look good.
Thankfully by the time we were running out of hobbies to talk about, the bell rang and class was over. As we packed up our things I was bombarded by the little girls. They gave me bracelets and drawings and we took photos together and they wanted our QQ#s (QQ is an online chat thing kind of like Facebook). Their drawings are impressive too! image

image

We surprised them and told them we were giving them English names next week, so today Lev and I recruited a few of our classmates to help us make 20 girl's name cards and 20 boy's name cards. These are some of the other teachers as well. image

image


They are going to flip. Also...we didn't want to give them super boring names so here are all of my students names ( I may or may not have gotten some inspiration from family and friends): Sophia, Emma,Lily,Nora, Kelly, Piper,Emily, Ella, Abby,Addi, Layla, Suzy, Daisy, Alina, Hazel, Nicole, Leah, Pearl, Beth,Chelsea, Bob, Riley, Noah, George
Mikey, Bill, Tyler, Ian, Brian, Roman, Milo, Logan, Ryan, Max, Eli, Brad, Nemo, Ash, Adam, Cole, and Parker.
....and since I didn't actually get this posted last night because my classmates and I went to the night market near my house image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

(yea I bought that hat, and the things the women is cooking is called stinky tofu, it makes you want to vomit as soon as you smell it but is delicious ounces cooked)
and threw a party in our dorm lounge I will skip this week a little bit andtalk about today Friday March 22nd. My fellow teacher, classmate and seattleite is an avid vlogger so he was pretty much recording us the whole time teaching and interacting with the kids so as soon as he is done putting his vlog altogether I will post that as well so you can witness first hand the amount of excitement giving out English names created. And oh was it exciting. Half of them can't pronounce their names and we are waiting for them to forget to bring their name cards to class next week but for the time being it is nice to be able to call out their names or ask certain kids to spell words. It makes us feel like real teachers (:
We were told we had to give them a spelling bee so we showed up to class with a list of words, and of course I spelled one wrong on the chalk board. *facepalm* they were none to thrilled and talked us down to only using half the words that we came up with, but we threw in a few tough ones like Mississippi and computer. I'm not sure how its going to workout but we told them if they could spell all the words right they would get a prize, so we are going to have to drop ¥50 on erasers, pencils and some chocolate. It will literally only be a few dollars. As we were leaving today I was bombarded with gifts. Candy, pencils, little toys, bracelets, keychains and someone gave me their brand new pencil case. Lev only got a tiny paper star. The other teachers aren't given anything at all, I'm not sure why this happens every time but it makes me feel guilty they give me all their trinkets, I wish I had something to give them in return. On that note, if anyone feels like sending cute American toys or candy to a group of 40 Chinese school children here is my address:
1026 Zeng Xianzi Building, Nanjing University
18 Jin Yin Street, Shanghai Road
Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, P. R. China
  1. 13675144386

Also if anyone has any good ideas for things we should teach them or fun activities please share!

The rest of last week went well. I had a grammar test that I feel like I did very well on and a few 听写 that I got good marks on as well. The most eventful thing that happened all week was catching my host families microwave on fire while making 墨西哥菜. But that's a long story and a blog post all on its own so check back for that and lots of pictures!
All in all the highlights of my week are as follows.
Wednesday: I finally got a picture with the most interesting man in the world's car. He is this husky looking man who wears bright pink plaid suits and drives a Mini Cooper covered in flowers and a Minnie Mouse painted on the side, turns out he is an English teacher who teaches in our building. I got to ride in the elevator with him one day....it's like being in the presence of a celebrity. image

image


Thursday I bought a coconut and it took me about an hour to drink the whole thing. For only $1 I will probably end up buying one of these a day.
image

image

after going to the night market on Thursday we rode the bus home, and we all sat in the back, we did what we liked to call a "social experiment" which involved us yelling Chinese proverbs at people walking on the street or in the cars next to us. The only proverb I know how to say is "a loss may turn out to be a gain" so every bus stop that we came too we said it to those still waiting for their bus. We definitely scared a few people and were a little over zealous but we had a blast. At one point I gave up on the proverbs and just yelled out 泰坦尼克号, titanic. That really threw people off. By the time we got off the bus the driver was none too thrilled with us.
Friday: I got on the bus to head to school, same bus from the night before, and same driver. BUT I got the whole bus to myself!! image

image

image

image

this is the construction they are doing for the Nanjing youth Olympics. They are adding in a bunch of new subway lines. Today we also went shopping after teaching and me and my classmate wore matching long skirts, oh and I got to see more old men with birds.
image

image

image

image

image

image

Posted by Kaceyroo 08:17 Archived in China Comments (3)

(Entries 6 - 10 of 28) « Page 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 »